Captain James Cook
The Second Voyage 1772 - 1775

A series of marine paintings by Robin Brooks

Resolution and Adventure in the Antarctic, Tobias Furneaux, and the tomb of Captain Furneaux.

Marine painting: 'As for Resolution' by Robin Brooks

As for Resolution


Captain Cook's Resolution
Oil on canvas 12" x 16" (30.5 cm x 40.5 cm)
In the collection of Andrew David Esq.

"As for the Resolution, that honest product of Mr Fishburn's yard at Whitby, she proved one of the great, one of the superb, ships of history; of all the ships of the past, could she by magic be recreated and made immortal, one would gaze on her with something like reverence." - J.C. Beaglehole

The title is taken from a piece in Professor Beaglehole's book, 'The Journals of Captain James Cook', Volume II.

This little painting, so full of life, shows Resolution and Adventure in Antarctic waters. The painting was completed on the artist's return from Whitby in 1988. He had visited the Captain Cook Memorial Museum to study the magnificent, newly completed model of the Resolution, built by the South African model shipwright, Bob Lightly.

Summary of the 2nd Voyage




Limited Edition marine print of 'As for Resolution' by Robin Brooks

Voyages of Captain Cook
Exclusive Special Edition Print


'As for Resolution' has been released as a superb special edition print. The print is available as a lithograph on paper and is signed by the artist.

To purchase this print, View Prints





Marine painting: 'The Gale Abating' by Robin Brooks

The Gale Abating


Captain Cook's Adventure
Oil on canvas 16" x 22" (40.5 cm x 56 cm)

Captain Tobias Furneaux was appointed Commander of HM Sloop Adventure on 28th November 1771 to accompany Captain Cook's Resolution on one of the greates sailing ship voyages of all time. 'The Gale Abating' is a superb and spirited portrait of the Adventure under double reefed topsails and courses.

"'The Gale Abating' is one of the best marine paintings I have ever seen"
Audrey Hinks, Director, Gallerie Marine, Appledore, Devon.

Summary of the 2nd Voyage




Limited Edition marine print of 'The Gale Abating' by Robin Brooks

Voyages of Captain Cook
Exclusive Special Edition Print


'The Gale Abating' has been released as a superb special edition print. The print is available as a lithograph on paper and is signed by the artist.

To purchase this print, View Prints





Portrait of Captain Tobias Furneaux
Portrait of Tobias Furneaux
by Northcote.


Tomb of Captain Tobias Furneaux

Captain Tobias Furneaux

Commander of HM Sloop Adventure. He was born in Swilly House, Stoke Damerel, near Plymouth, England on 21st August 1735. He joined the Navy as a midshipman serving off the African Coast and the West Indies. In 1776, he set sail as a second lieutenant on a frigate named 'Dolphin' under the command of Captain Wallis. The voyage was of exploration to the South Pacific. Captain Wallis, the first officer and some of the crew were taken ill and Tobias found himself in charge of the ship. He was a good officer and this experience made him the ideal candidate as Cook's second. Cook and Furneaux, their ships and men, crossed the Antarctic circle on 17th January 1773 at 11.15am. They were the first recorded humans to have done so. Captain Tobias Furneaux was the first man to ever circumnavigate the globe twice, once in each direction.

To appreciate Tobias' place in history, the reader could do no better than refer to 'The Journals of Captain James Cook - the Voyage of the Resolution and Adventure 1772-1775', edited by J.C. Beaglehole, published by the Hakluyt Society. Also 'Tobias Furneaux Circumnavigator' by Rupert Furneaux, published by Cassell 1960.

The photograph on the left shows the tomb of Tobias Furneaux as St Andrew and St Mary's Church, Stoke Damerel, Plymouth, England. He died at Swilly House aged 46 in 1781.

Tobias was born at Swilly House, Stoke Damerel (then on the outskirts of Plymouth), 21st August 1735.


Coming soon, new oil painting by Robin Brooks - William Hodges, HM Adventure and the Antarctic. Please check back regularly.





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